Landscape Irrigation Rules

Starting on July 26th homeowners will be allowed to resume non-turf landscape irrigation based on revised irrigation rules and an updated irrigation schedule.

Overview

At the July 21st Board of Directors Meeting, the Board approved the resumption of non-turf irrigation starting on Monday, July 26th based on revised irrigation rules and an updated schedule.


Non-Turf Irrigation

While we are still awaiting our permits from the State to operate the uranium treatment at Wells #2 & #3, with the gearbox at Well #1 now replaced and the Lukins Brothers Water Company (LBWC) inter-tie operational it is possible to allow a controlled amount non-turf irrigation. The intent is to allow homeowners to water shrubs, flowers, and trees while still keeping overall water demand limited.

The goal is to keep overall demand below what can be met by Well #1 (1000 gpm) and the LBWC inter-tie (550 gpm) such that we limit the use of Well #3 until we receive State approval to operate it with treatment.

Revised Irrigation Rules

The Board of Directors has published the following revised irrigation rules that will be in place from July 26th for non-turf landscape irrigation:


10.1 Irrigation Limits.
Irrigation shall be calibrated and scheduled to deliver no more than the following:

  • March 20 – June 30 and September 1 – November 30: 1.5 inches per week
  • July 1 – August 31: 2.0 inches per week

10.2 Irrigation Scheduling.
Subject to the exemptions below, landscape irrigation is permitted only on designated irrigation days, as designated in Schedule A (below).

10.3 Exemptions from Irrigation Schedule.
No exceptions to irrigation schedule for new plant material (including new turf).

10.4 Prohibited Activities.
No Owner, nor an Owner’s tenant, contractor, employee, or agent may engage in any of the following activities:

  • Irrigation is Prohibited on Memorial Day Weekend, July Fourth Weekend, and Labor Day Weekend
  • Allowing water to flow over the ground surface or from sprinklers onto surfaces that are not able to absorb water or onto neighboring properties.
  • Use of a hose without an automatic shut-off nozzle.
  • Use of water to wash sidewalks, driveways, parking areas, tennis courts, decks, patios, or other improved areas.
  • Any activity prohibited by federal, state, or local law or regulation.

Schedule A – Irrigation Schedule

GroupStreet/Streets/LocationIrrigation DaysTime Period for
Irrigation
Group 1
(red)
Venice Drive, Tuolumne Drive, Lassen Drive,
Shasta Court, Dana Court, Dover Drive and
15th Street
Sunday, Tuesday, and
Thursday
1:00AM-3:00AM
Group 2
(teal)
Alpine Drive, Cascade Court, Cathedral Court,
Genevieve Court, Tahoe Keys Blvd, Danube
Drive, Morro Drive, Monterey Drive and Lucerne
Way
Sunday, Tuesday, and
Thursday
3:00AM-5:00AM
Group 3
(green)
Texas Avenue, Whitney Drive, Aloha Drive,
Daggett Court, and Carson Court
Sunday, Tuesday, and
Thursday
5:00AM-7:00AM
Group 4
(purple)
Capri Drive, Inverness Drive, Catalina Drive,
Kokanee Way, Crystal Court, and Lido Drive
Monday, Wednesday and
Saturday
1:00AM-3:00AM
Group 5
(brown)
Beach Drive, Beach Lane, Beach Court, White
Sands Drive, Balboa Drive, Marconi Way, and
Garmish Court
Monday, Wednesday and
Saturday
3:00AM-5:00AM
Group 6
(blue)
Lighthouse Shores Drive, Emerald Drive,
Christie Drive, Traverse Court, Slalom Court,
Wedeln Court, and Weir Way
Monday, Wednesday and
Saturday
5:00AM-7:00AM
Group 7
(yellow)
TKPOA Townhomes: Cove 1, Cove 2, Cove 2A,
Cove 3A, Cove 3B, Cove 3C, Cove 4, Cove 5,
Tahoe Marina Shores (TMS), Islanders 1,
Islanders 2, and Islanders 3
Sunday, Tuesday, and
Thursday
10:00PM-12:00AM
Group 8
(pink)
TKPOA-Owned Common Areas, Mt. Tallac
Village 3 (South Tahoe Public Utility District
Service)
Monday, Wednesday and
Saturday
10:00PM-12:00AM

Enforcement and penalties for non-compliance.

Homeowners found irrigating turf or irrigating outside of their allotted window, as per Schedule A above, using TKWC water will be subject to disciplinary action, including the levying of a recurring fine until compliance is achieved.

Frequently asked questions

We’re sure you have many questions regarding the irrigation rules and schedule and the measures being taken to ensure our Water Company is able to supply sufficient water for landscape irrigation moving forward. We have tried to answer some of the common ones here.

While we do not have all the answers at this time, if you have any concerns or questions, do not hesitate to reach out to our General Manager, Kirk Wooldridge ([email protected]).

Why can’t I water my grass yet?

We are still awaiting our permits from the State to operate the uranium treatment at Wells #2 & #3, until then we need to keep overall demand below what can be met by Well #1 (1000 gpm) and the LBWC inter-tie (550 gpm) such that we limit the use of Well #3 until we receive State approval to operate it with treatment.

Allowing homeowners to irrigate lawns would likely exceed the capacity of Well #1 and the Lukins inter-tie, so for the time being we are only allowing non-turf irrigation.

When will I be able to water my grass?

As soon as the State permits the use of uranium treatment for Well #3 we will be able to allow full landscape irrigation based on the revised rules and updated schedule.

We don’t control this timeline, unfortunately. Installation of treatment for Wells #2 & #3 has been completed and we expect the have initial test results back around July 28th. These will then be submitted to the State for approval.

Our best guess is that we will receive our permits sometime in August, exactly when is unclear.

Why can I only water overnight for two hours?

The overnight irrigation schedule helps to keep the water demand for irrigation at a time when the overall demand for drinking water is at its lowest.

By limiting the irrigation window to two hours per homeowner, three days a week, we spread the demand over a nine-hour period as opposed to everyones’ sprinklers coming on at the same time in the morning.

Both of these measures are critical to “flattening” the demand curve and spreading it throughout the night to reduce the typical peak demand caused by irrigation that might exceed our limited capacity at this time.